Article in ArtNews: Inside Job


Inside Job: In the Tradition of Institutional Critique, Artists Are Throwing Wrenches Into the Art World’s Works

by Andrew Russeth

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Pilvi Takala – The Stroker

 
12 January 2017
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Hear internationally acclaimed artist Pilvi Takala in conversation with art curator Teresa Calonje on the unique performance piece that was commissioned by and created for Second Home in the summer of 2016.

For 10 days in July, Takala lived and worked at Second Home posing as Nina Nieminen, an entrepreneur interested in the positive impact of being touched.

Nina and her fictional business ‘Personnel Touch’ were integrated into the community on the premise of being a new part of Second Home’s wellbeing programme.

During her time at Second Home, Pilvi captured and archived people’s reactions to being touched and has since used this research to form the basis of a new performance piece which has been produced in collaboration with dancer Emma Waltraud Howes.

The dance piece will be showcased at Second Home in the afternoon and Pilvi and Teresa will discuss it as well as Pilvi’s experience of performing as Nina in Liberia in the evening.

Second Home thanks the Finnish Institute for their generous support of this event.

secondhome.io/cultural-programme/pilvi-takala-the-stroker

Pilvi Takala at Pump House Gallery


11 January – 27 March 2017
Pump House Gallery
Battersea Park, London, SW11 4NJ

Solo exhibition
Pilvi Takala

Pump House Gallery presents an exhibition building on The Committee, a 2013 project by artist Pilvi Takala.

For the project funded by the Emdash Award, Takala invited a group of children from a youth centre in Bow, London to spend her £7,000 award in any way they wished. They decided to design and produce a custom-made bouncy castle called “Five Star Bouncy House”, which could be used by them and hired out to raise funds for the youth centre. In Takala’s video that follows the process, the children explain how they decided to spend the prize money, discussing the process of decision-making and the values that guided them.

As part of the exhibition the “Five Star Bouncy House” will be erected on weekends when the weather permits.

About the artist:

In her complex and rich practice Pilvi Takala confuses the space of exactly what the work is, whether a performance, a video, a sculpture or the space left behind after one of her interactions. Takala’s work sits between a serious investigation and playful agitation of social and political structures. Using disguise to engage and negotiate different social terrains, she reveals unspoken rules within systems of culture.

Takala (b. 1981) lives and works in Berlin.

pumphousegallery.org.uk/programme/pilvi-takala



The Profound Boredom Of Paul Cowan, Bernhard Hegglin, Georgie Nettell, Pilvi Takala, Hanna Törnudd & Annette Wehrmann


The Profound Boredom Of Paul Cowan, Bernhard Hegglin, Georgie Nettell, Pilvi Takala, Hanna Törnudd & Annette Wehrmann

curated by Geraldine Tedder

Opening Saturday 17th of December 6pm
18.12.16 - 21.01.17
Saturdays 12 - 17 or by appointment

Riverside
Schmiedeweg 4, 3048 Worblaufen

www.riverside-space.ch

A Rule By Nobody

Image Credit: Liz Magic Laser, still from The Thought Leader, 2015

A Rule By Nobody
Presented by Third Object
As part of the Fall Curatorial Residency
at Sector 2337

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, October 16th, 7 pm, $5

A Rule By Nobody is an exploration of the boredoms, frustrations and pleasures of bureaucratic routines. Drawing its title from Hannah Arendt’s definition of bureaucracy, the exhibition takes the bored energy of office labor and channels it into a multipart dive into the sublimely overflowing inbox, the inky warm Xerox room, the balled up wads of red tape, and the moments of escape that punctuate the droning beige sameness of nine to five.

This video program is a motivational, team-building corporate retreat through other people’s daily grinds. The works in the screening emulate and parody various workplaces and their hierarchical structures to reveal inner formulas, dogmas and breaking points.

Program Details:
Hanne Lippard, Beige, 2013, Germany, digital video, 6m5s, color, sound

Kay Rosen, Sisyphus, 1991/2011, USA, digital video, 2m1s, black and white, no sound

Liz Magic Laser, The Thought Leader, 2015, USA, digital video, 9m21s, color, sound

Simon Denny, Diligent Boardbooks Website Presentation, 2011, Germany, digital video, 1m20s, color, sound

Ellen Nielsen, Flower Office, 2016, USA, digital video, 3m18s, color, sound

Jodie Mack, Unsubscribe #3: Glitch Envy, 2010, USA, 16mm, 5m45s, color, sound

Lawrence Weiner, To and Fro. Fro and To. And To and Fro. And Fro and To., 1972, USA, 1/2” open reel video transferred to digital video, black and white, sound

Pilvi Takala, The Trainee, 2008, Finland, digital video, 13m52s, color, sound

Andrew Norman Wilson, Workers Leaving the Googleplex, 2009-2011, USA, digital video, 11m3s, color, sound

This exhibition series is organized under the Fall Curatorial Residency at Sector 2337. It is composed of a two-part group exhibition, an ongoing back room installation, a video screening at the Nightingale Cinema, a live performance, and a printed publication.

Third Object is a roving curatorial collective based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Slow Stretch, Mana Contemporary Chicago; Satellites, The Franklin; Were the Eye Not Sunlike, ACRETV and Fernwey; and Mossy Cloak, Roots and Culture. Third Object is Ann Meisinger, Raven Munsell, and Gan Uyeda.

A Rule By Nobody is made possible through the support of Sector 2337, the Propeller Fund, Direct Office Furniture Warehouse, Video Data Bank and the Nightingale Cinema.

www.facebook.com/events/581777108678065/

Right of Refusal



 MOBILITY IN POST DEMOCRACY

Mon 24 Oct 2016
5.30PM-9.00PM

The New School University Center
Starr Foundation Hall, UL
New York City
Free Admission
 
Mobility in Post Democracy
Post Democracy has recently arisen as a complex and contradictory term: for some it promises a new participatory platform for the mobilizing forces of social media, considered catalysts for political imagination. Others equate Post Democracy with democracy's demise due to the penetration of global capitalism into every regime type coupled with the increasing intervention of international actors in domestic politics. Decried as "democratic melancholy," such skepticism is considered ill placed by yet others for whom "democracy" was never a political system to aspire to.

Under the heading Mobility in Post Democracy, the Vera List Center is presenting a series of interdisciplinary panels, seminars, and lectures that examine Post Democracy as a condition informed by mobility – across institutions, states, and ideologies. The series brings together an international group of scholars, activists, students, and artists to probe the concept of Democracy more generally at the time of the contested U.S. presidential elections, and the concurrent emergence and demise of democratic regimes throughout the world.

Artist-driven, the events aim to ask questions such as: How can new social movements counter networks of power? What creative organizing tactics are being developed to reinvigorate a democratic ethos? What forms of political institutions and alliances are flexible and resilient?

Right of Refusal
With many states on the brink of a democratic collapse, the Mobility in Post Democracy series connects to the simultaneous disdain and opportunity revealed in this moment. On the heels of a keynote address by Wendy Brown, which will reveal the neoliberal mechanisms that have undermined democracy while pointing toward modes of resistance in new organizational models, this panel discussion will consider refusal as another possible strategy to thwart the further erosion of liberal democracy. By framing resistance as a human right, the right of refusal invokes coordinated action, solidarity, and the law to magnify the political implications of individual decisions. These discussions are particularly relevant as voters in the United States consider their options in the forthcoming presidential elections.

Discourses on human rights are primarily concerned with protecting and supporting individuals as active members of society. Active participation requires two general categories of rights: rights that protect individuals from discrimination, oppression, and other forms of harm; and rights to social, political, cultural, and economic resources necessary to participate, often in the form of material support from states.

This seminar focuses on another form of rights that are often overlooked in rights-based discourses: the right to refuse and embrace non-participation. The right of refusal can take many different forms. In the face of increased globalization and hyper-mobility, how can the right to remain stave off urban developers and alter the flow of migrants? Is it possible to opt out of a digital presence through the right to be forgotten? How does the right of refusal challenge the role of the state as protector and provider? For the 2016 U.S. presidential elections, many voters are considering opting out instead of choosing between the Republican and Democratic candidates. What does non-participation mean for our ability to question and critique the government? What are the affordances of collective refusal, as in a boycott? Is refusal a form of protest, a sign of privilege, the mark of apathy, or something else entirely?

The event begins with a film screening/interactive gaming session from 5-6pm in the University Center Event Cafe, followed by a panel discussion from 6:30-8pm exploring the various manifestations the right of refusal may take. The participants in this event argue for the right to refuse action and participation, to remain silent, to reject market principles of efficiency, to refuse to be part of the system. The upcoming U.S. elections provide the context to consider the ramifications of non-participation.

Participants
Colleen Macklin, Associate Professor of Design and Technology, Parsons
Lucas Pinheiro, Lecturer in New Media Art History, Parsons
Joshua Simon, Curator and 2011-2013 VLC Fellow
Pilvi Takala, Artist
Miriam Ticktin, Associate Professor of Anthropology, New School for Social research

www.veralistcenter.org/engage/events/2024/right-of-refusal/